The Corporation for Battery Recycling Helps Shape First National Battery Take-Back Legislation in Vermont

By May 16, 2014 Press Releases No Comments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Corporation for Battery Recycling Helps Shape First National Battery Take-Back Legislation in Vermont

New York, NYMay 14, 2014—The Corporation for Battery Recycling (CBR) applauds the Vermont Legislature for passing the first collection and recycling law for single-use batteries in the nation. House Bill 695, which now goes to Gov. Peter Shumlin for signing, represents a first step to create laws that keep batteries from landfills.

“CBR played a major role in drafting the bill. There is much more to do to create a financially and environmentally sustainable program that could be a model for other states. Our next task is to work with state agencies to make this a reality,” said Marc Boolish, president of CBR.

The bill will require companies that sell single-use batteries in the state of Vermont to take them back when they no longer hold energy, keeping them out of the waste stream. However, the bill exempts several categories of sellers including industrial, business-to-business, warranty or maintenance service, and non-personal use. While CBR is pleased to see battery legislation pass in Vermont, it strongly believes these exemptions – which are not part of CBR’s model battery legislation – may distort costs, add complexities and allow many battery producers to avoid participating and paying for their fair share of the program. CBR plans to work hard to help the state address this before implementation of the bill in 2016 so that there is a level playing field for all market participants in a manner that truly advances shared environmental objectives.

About CBR

The Corporation for Battery Recycling (CBR) was incorporated as a nonprofit in 2011 with a long-term vision to

lead and shape a national program that maximizes reuse of spent battery materials with a goal of “zero waste.” Founding members of CBR are Energizer Holdings, Inc., Duracell (a Procter and Gamble company) and Panasonic Energy Corporation of America.

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