Voluntary National Battery Recycling Program Proposed

By July 15, 2012 News No Comments

The non-profit organization, Corporation of Battery Recycling (CBR), issued a request for proposal (RFP) “seeking a stewardship organization to build a national program that is convenient and inspires consumers to participate by recycling the batteries they use in a range of electronic and household devices.”

Marc Boolish, president of CBR, in a news release says “Our vision is to have an industry-led voluntary program that redefines how U.S. consumers dispose of batteries, maximizing the reuse of spent battery materials and producing zero waste to landfill.”

The RFP follows a study done my Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), titled “Life Cycle Impacts of Alkaline Batteries with a Focus on End-of-Life.” This study reports that –

“Approximately 80% of portable batteries manufactured in the US are so-called alkaline dry cells with a global annual production exceeding 10 billion units. Today, the majority of these batteries go to landfills at end-of-life. An increased focus on environmental issues related to battery disposal, along with recently implemented battery directives in Europe and Canada and waste classification legislation in California, has intensified discussions about end-of-life battery regulations globally.”

CBR is comprised of the four largest US battery companies, Duracell, Energizer, Panasonic and Rayovac.

 

Let us know what you think –    Do you think a national voluntary battery recycling program can succeed?
 

If you have any questions or need help finding a place to recycle batteries, just Contact eCyclingCenter.

Posted in Alkaline Batteries Recycling, Battery Recycling, Rechargeable Battery Recycling, Single Use Battery Recycling | No Comments »

What is the cost/benefit of recycling alkaline batteries — Part 1

Friday, July 13th, 2012

California is currently the only state that requires residents and businesses to recycle single-use alkaline batteries. All other states discontinued recycling when mercury was banned in production of alkaline batteries. This means that these batteries can now be put in the regular trash, which goes to landfills — except in California.

So, does California knows something the rest of the country doesn’t know? Do these batteries, even without mercury, still have a significant environmental impact when put in landfills?

According to a recent study done by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) the answer depends on the entire end-of-life battery processing, such as collection process, recycling process and the amount of materials recovered.

The benefits of recycling are most significant when materials, such as zinc and steel, are recovered during recycling. The reason is that batteries have the most impact on the environment during the production of the raw materials. So, using recycled material in new battery production, instead of virgin materials, creates the greatest environmental savings during the batteries life-cycle.

But what exactly is enough recycled materials to justify recycling? What is the total environmental impact of battery end-of-life processing?

 

Let us know what you think –If recycling single-use alkaline batteries produces the same total environmental impact as putting batteries in landfills, should single-use alkaline batteries be recycled?  

If you have any questions or need help finding a place to recycle batteries, just Contact eCyclingCenter.

Posted in Alkaline Batteries Recycling, Battery Recycling, Single Use Battery Recycling | No Comments »

12 Days of Christmas Recycling: Day 1 – Single-Use Batteries

 

Monday, December 12th, 2011

On the first day of Christmas, my friend gave to me a single-use alkaline battery.

Single-Use Alkaline Batteries But the gifts that really keep on giving are rechargeable batteries. They cost a little bit more and may take a little more time to buy, but in the end they save both money and the environment.

And of course, no matter what type of batteries you give with your gifts be sure to mention that all batteries should be recycled when the time comes. Even if the state where you live doesn’t requires your batteries to be recycled, it’s always a good idea to recycle.

If you have any questions or need help finding a place to recycle batteries, just Contact eCyclingCenter.

http://ecyclingcenter.com/blog/?cat=56